Beyonce performs at a Get Out the Vote concert for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton at the Wolstein Center in Cleveland, Ohio, Nov. 4, 2016. Credit: AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

#BeyDay in Houston countdown

Houston: we have a problem!!! Well, a good problem, that is. Beyoncé will be touching down on the 23rd, and I have one question to ask you. Are you going or nah? These social media algorithms are hard at work dishing out her Renaissance World Tour visuals in every city. Bey recently celebrated her 42nd birthday in style in Los Angeles. The event was marked by stunning performances and unforgettable moments, featuring the iconic Kendrick Lamar and a surprise appearance by the legendary Diana Ross who serenaded Beyoncé with the Happy Birthday song. It was a moment for the culture many didn’t know they needed. Two icons paying homage and respect to each other was a sight to see at least from the clips I see on the internet. It leaves me to wonder who might perform with her on stage when she comes home? Maybe Meg Thee Stallion? Or Destiny’s Child? Either way, Houston is about to show up all the other cities on this tour, and I can’t wait to see what she has up her sleeve next.

Unsettling reality: Violence against Black women

Unfortunately, even as we celebrate Black excellence, we are confronted with the stark reality that Black women often find themselves in vulnerable positions. The recent incident involving a young Black woman named Rho Bashe, who was attacked in Houston with a brick for refusing to give her number to a man, is a painful reminder of the challenges Black women face.

This incident reflects a broader debate about the perception that Black women are among the most unprotected in our society, leaving them susceptible to violence and discrimination. It’s crucial for society to address these issues and work towards creating a safer environment for all. She immediately recorded the aftermath explaining how she was attacked and the men who witnessed the attacked did not step in to help. There were many people who had negative responses on this video due to the fact that she made a previous video about how “men are not providers or protectors” because they “only protect what they possess.” To be honest, in this case she made a point. Women did step up to testify how they share their numbers with men they aren’t interested in out of fear that this might happen to them if they don’t. A Go Fund Me account has raised more than $33,000 for hospital bills, therapy, and childcare expenses.

Al Sharpton’s challenge to rappers: Trump and Black voters

Civil rights activist Al Sharpton has taken a bold stance by calling out Black men and rappers who support former President Donald Trump. On an episode of “The ReidOut,” he joined a discussion to remind viewers of Trump’s contentious history involving criminal injustice against the Black community. Sharpton, well-known for his activism in civil rights, particularly emphasized the case of the young Black boys who were wrongly accused and charged with sexually assaulting a white woman in Central Park in 1989, a case in which Trump played a prominent and controversial role – even calling the young brothers savages who deserved the death penalty.

Sharpton pointed out that Trump’s own history, including his mugshot and felony charges, ought to make him a less appealing figure to Black people, especially Black men who have historically been targets of systemic injustices. Sharpton said he plans to closely monitor the narrative surrounding Trump’s popularity among Black men in the lead-up to the 2024 presidential election.

I cover Houston's education system as it relates to the Black community for the Defender as a Report for America corps member. I'm a multimedia journalist and have reported on social, cultural, lifestyle,...