Commissioner Rodney Ellis, left, with Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Texas Southern University President Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young looking on, outlines the recently completed $12 million construction project on Cleburne Street near TSU. The work is part of a $43.1 million investment made by Harris County Precinct One and the City of Houston to repair five streets around TSU and University of Houston. Photo courtesy of Harris Co Precinct One Office.

While celebrating the completion of a $12 million construction project on Cleburne Street that includes a shared-use path on both sides for pedestrians and cyclists, Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis, Mayor Sylvester Turner and Texas Southern University President Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young announced the upcoming start of Phase II of the TSU project that involves improvements to Blodgett, Rosewood and Tierwester streets.

The work is part of a $43.1 million investment made by Harris County Precinct One and the City of Houston to repair five streets around TSU and University of Houston.

“Every community should have safer streets with bike lanes, sidewalks and better lighting,” Ellis said during a recent news conference at TSU. “This investment in road reconstruction in our University Corridor will continue to improve safety and accessibility for all users, including pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists and transit riders.”

Of the $43.1 million project involving streets near TSU and UH, Precinct One invested $38 million (88%) and the city spent $5 million (12%).

Turner said the construction near TSU and UH is part of Third Ward’s Complete Communities initiative action plan created “to support equitable economic development in under-resourced neighborhoods and, at the same time, keep affordable housing in the community and improve the quality of life for residents.”

“You may not know this, Commissioner Ellis, but the first thing I said is: ‘Look at the beautiful road on Cleburne Street,’” said Crumpton-Young, reflecting on the first day she drove to TSU to begin her tenure as president.

In addition to the two-lane concrete street and shared-use path, the Cleburne work includes $2.8 million spent on landscaping and improved street and pedestrian lighting. The work also entailed improving drainage and planting more than 240 trees.

“None of this could have been possible without the partnership of the City of Houston and the two universities. This is an example of how local governments and universities can achieve more by working together and leveraging our resources to better serve the community,” said Ellis.